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Tonkichi Tonkatsu Seafood in Causeway Bay

The weird thing about Hong Kong is that isn’t really about Chinese food. Hong Kong isn’t Chinese. It’s well… a bit of everything. A bit of a reinterpreted mess.

English tea is evolved and has become black tea and evaporated milk with an emphasis on smoothness. And Hong Kong’s national food? Well Japanese food must come a close second and it is held in as high esteem here as we in England adore curry.

This is obviously no bad thing as we all love Japanese food and it is here in Hong Kong in resplendent quality. Tonkichi Tonkatsu Seafood is renowned as the place in Hong Kong to go for tonkatsu or breaded and deep fried pork cutlets (and tonkatsu… Oysters).

We went and it was all a bit too much for me. The portions would make an American kowtow (Japanese) / ketou (Chinese). The bread might have been crispy and the pork was tender but there were just too many fried breadcrumbs to fight your way through. The moderation, the balancing of portions, and aesthetics behind Japanese food seemed to be absent. Compared to the less lauded Sapporo Japanese Restaurant in Central it falls short.  Though I have to admit tonkatsu is one of those dishes where I think a lot turns on what you grew up eating… Perhaps this is just too much for me.

That said, I did love the deep fried oysters which were impossibly fresh as they nestled within the batter. If I went back I’ld stick to the seafood.

  • Price – 300hkd ish for a set meal (£26)
  • Shop 412, 4/F, World Trade Centre, 280 Gloucester Road, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong

4 Comments

  1. e_ting / e 婷

    I agree about the crumbing & frying, but I reckon the Japanese must nonetheless be commended on their ability to refine something so potentially crude (deep-fried everything)! By the way, I also think their pork is a bit too lean and hence tends towards dryness. My post about it here :) http://www.e-tingfood.com/2009/05/swine-pig-h1n1-its-all-tonkatsu-to-me.html

  2. Mr Noodles

    They do love their Japanese food in HK and I look forward to more posts! On reinterpreted weird HK food & drink, have you tried yin-yong, coffee mixed with tea? Until I visited HK, I thought my Dad was a bit strange when he used to drink supersize cup of milky tea laced with a spoon of Nescafe.

  3. The Grubworm

    Oh, now, i love tonkatsu, but that looks like a lot. The most they serve in Japan is a single cutlet, and that over a bowl of rice with some egg on top. By itself, well, it can be just a bit too much. I prefer it with something else to lighten and soften the food. Saying that, it does look tasty.

    @Mr Noodles – i remember trying that, very odd indeed, but weirdly tasty after a few goes – definitely a grower, although not something I'd try at home.

  4. Tom

    E_ting – well I always think of the difference between the Japanese (tempura) and the Scottish (deep fried mars bars) if I ever want to draw an extreme comparison :).

    Noodles – I am still learning to like milk tea. I am putting the effort in like my first tastes of beer. I am actually intending to do some posts on HK classics. Milk tea, yin-yong, HK breakfasts etc. soon. Just adjusting to them first : )

    Grubworm – the thing I find with Japanese food (like good 3* haute cuisine) is that you may leave full to death but it never looks like much. It is a slow war of food attrition which gets you, not simple size crudeness.

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