monster sausages (feature image © 2011 . All rights reserved.

The Cock Up – Hong Kong’s first cocktail sausage event

We’ve been in Hong Kong a while now and one thing I’ve noticed is that whilst the food here smacks the food in the West in its face there is one thing missing: fun.

Dining experiences* here are often dry affairs in hotel sub basements or from chains pumping out “concept” restaurants instead of the pop ups or supper clubs driven by young passionate chefs that I used to love back home. I don’t know whether it is because of the insane rents, cultural differences or plain disinterest but it is time we actually did something about it rather than complain.

So to “The Cock Up”.

Hong Kong has a lot of traditional food heroes – shark’s fin, sea cucumber… blah blah blah. However, let’s be honest, unless you are a tai-pan trying to show off they aren’t everyday fare. Instead the real star of Cantonese cuisine is the humble cocktail sausage.

So this Sunday 26 June, we are hosting a cocktail sausage pop up. Below are the categories:

  • Best “Just Like Mom Used to Make”
  • Best “Artsy Fartsy Fusion Mess”
  • Best “Historically Accurate for any Time Period of Your Choice”
  • Best “Sculpture”

Attendees include some of Hong Kong’s blogger luminaries – Char Xiu Bau, e_tingHK Epicurus, HK Fashion Geek, g4gary, Mocachocolata Rita, Dimsumdiva and some of our other friends who are far too sensible to blog and who are a deft hand with a sausage.

So keep watching for the winners and if you have a secret skill with cocktail sausages drop us an email (here) or tweet me (here) and I’ll let you know the details.

* which is why I love the cooked food centres, dai pai dongs and hawker stalls so much

8 Comments

  1. so bummed i am not there! but look forward to the tweets and photos and the write up of course!

  2. I hear supperclubs are just about taking off in HK but they are definitely one thing I miss from London, now being out here in Asia. Your cocktail sausage event will be a first!

  3. Tess

    So freakin’ fun! Friends in Portland used to host an annual “Fourth of Jell-o” party- I don’t think there were any attempts made at deliciousness, but the sculpting/artsy-posturing/jello-throwing fun was through the roof.

  4. How fun!! Love that photo!

  5. BritChineseFoodie

    lol. Erm.. I think “food” is not meant to be “fun”. It is meant to nourish you, or if you find an absolute decent chef, who has gone kind of underground and doing his creative thing..(and they do exist, but you need to suss them out)…. then you will be in for a treat ! I can recommend such a place near Sogo Dept store. On the right hand side of Sogo, there is an entrance to a lift. In that list of buildings, you will find a Japanese restaurant. That is SO amazing. The freshness of the fish, and the culinary skill of the chefs are just to DIE for. Apart from the fact that he knows the freshness of his fish, he was combining some exciting combination with his existing ingredient list. I got the impression that this young chef, wanted to please his customers more on the joy and experience of sushi than on earning lots of money. Cos he was very humble, and I genuinely thinks such talents should indeed be championed.

    You may also want to check this out too.
    http://www.openrice.com/restaurant/index.htm

    Disregard some comments on Western restaurants, as the locals do not seem to really enjoy some of the more authentic European dishes in general… However, Japanese, and Chinese food, and also “local” delicacies are really well reviewed on that site. Have fun! Btw, if you want ethnic Hong-Kong-descendents-from-Indian-heritage kind of curry, you will find them at Chung King Mansion.

    Go to Macau for some colonial food. Go to Sai Kung for the seafood. Go to one of these restaurants where the fish still swims! There is a local foodie guide that you can get from newspaper stands which are fairly good and reputable. I think the kind of restaurants which you are after can be found in Knutsford Terrace.

    The culinary scene in HK is changing SO fast, as people’s tastes are so discerning that turnover of decent chefs are quite high. People go for the image and experience more so than the food itself in these kind of climates now. So the REALLY good chefs can be found underground doing their own thing.

    • I have definitely agreed with your other recent comments but food is not meant to be fun? Madness. Of course it is meant to be fun – food is more than nourishment otherwise we would all be munching rice and supplemements. Food is about adventure, the reflection of a culture on the plate, about excitement, innovation and tradition all bundled up together and presented into something that makes you want to eat more even though you shouldn’t.

      The culinary scene in HK does change so fast but that is more from the high cost of rents than anything else. It is some of the classic understated places here which do the best food (thinking of the Kimberley in particular). The trendy up and down places (all the fro-yo places, the dessert places, the bare bones ramen shops etc.) are hit or miss but there is nothing substantive to them.

      However, I definitely agree with you on that building in CwB. We’ve been to quite a few floors in it and the food is a level above what you get outside of Japan. That said, quite a few of them are likely to be bankrupt as the faddist nature of the dining public here means most mainstream papers are saying don’t eat Japanese and they are listening.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.
Required fields are marked:*

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>